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What are projects?

A project is a piece of work whose tasks, estimates, procurement, resources and other aspects you manage in Broker Site Manager. This document explains central project-related terminology: main project, subproject, site, and project, and describes the recommended project structure for projects that you manage in Broker Site Manager.

Main projects and subprojects

Projects have a hierarchical structure in Broker Site Manager. At the top of the hierarchy are main projects, and below them are subprojects. Subprojects can have subprojects of their own, and their is no limit to the number of subproject levels that you can create.

The primary purpose of main projects is to group projects. You create for example tasks and estimates for subprojects, not main projects.

Below is an example of a project structure, where a main project has two subprojects, each of which has subprojects of their own:

  • Royal Albert Hall

    • Electrical automation renewal

      • Sales

      • Initiation and planning

      • Execution

      • Handover and closure

      • Warranty

    • Ventilation renewal

      • Sales

      • Initiation and planning

      • Execution

      • Handover and closure

      • Warranty

Sites and projects

Main projects have two types:

  • Site Use site for projects that happen in a single physical site, such as a factory or a building. For example, if your organisation does a project in Royal Albert Hall, add a main project of the type site for Royal Albert Hall.

  • Project Use project to group projects that don’t happen in a single physical site. For example, if your organisation records sales tasks in Broker Site Manager, you can add a main project of the type project for Sales.

When you manage construction projects or similar in Broker Site Manager, they should usually use the following project structure:

Main project for the site (for example Royal Albert Hall)
Links:
  • Owner
Subproject for a contract (for example Ventilation renewal)
Links:
  • Client, unless client is the site owner
  • Project manager
  • Project manager, client
Subproject I (for example Planning)
Links:
  • Project manager
  • Team
Subproject II (for example Execution)
Links:
  • Project manager
  • Team
...

The main takeaways from the project structure above are:

  • The main project with its links.

  • The topmost subproject with its links.

  • Dividing the topmost subproject into further subprojects, for example so that there are subprojects for estimating, execution and additional works. The number and scope of subprojects can vary according to your use case, and you can use pipelines to manage subprojects.

The project structure above lists the most important links of different project levels. Depending on your use case, you can also define the project manager and the client’s project manager in the main project, which makes all subprojects inherit them.

Projects that don’t take place at a site usually use the following project structure:

Main project for a set of projects (for example Tool management)
Links:
  • Client
Subproject (for example Vehicles)
Links:
  • As necessary
Subproject I (for example Tracking)
Links:
  • As necessary
Subproject II (for example Maintenance)
Links:
  • As necessary
...

The main takeaways from the project structure above are that you should:

  • Divide projects into subprojects.

  • Define the client at the top of the project hierarchy, or as high as possible, from where it is passed on to the project’s tasks.

Other links, such as project managers and teams should be defined at the project level where it makes most sense.

See also